The Ethics Of Same-Sex

Marriage”

Increasingly, nations are legalising same-sex marriage. On 26 June 2015 the Supreme Court of the United States of America ruled that marriage is a constitutional right and that no state could therefore say that same-sex marriage was illegal. The New Zealand parliament made same-sex marriages legal in April 2013 (coming into effect in August 2013). This is a major topic all on its own and needs fuller attention. For the moment, it should be clear that, if homosexual acts are sinful, then same-sex marriage is an institutionalising of sin. No Christian who loves God and His word can condone same-sex marriage. Furthermore, no Christian who loves people can condone it and not care that their sin will bring judgement. Many will argue that since God defines marriage – and He has defined it as the union of a man and a woman – no one has the authority to define it differently. Nations might, if they choose, recognise homosexual relationships and ensure that those in those relationships have the same rights as others, but they should not refer to it as marriage since it doesn’t fit the definition. Christians cannot enforce their ethical standards on others. People and nations will make their own choices. It is, nevertheless, discouraging and alarming for Christians to see people choosing to defy God, and to see governments not using legislation to encourage what is right. What can Christians do? Pray Continue to hold to biblical beliefs Uphold a culture that honours marriage, including modelling strong marriages Be concerned about anything that undermines marriage, including adultery, and any other heterosexual sins. In other words, treat all sexual sin the same way. Re-evaluate the biblical teaching on divorce and be as concerned about that as we are about same-sex marriage. Disciple younger Christians to have a biblical understanding of marriage. Work for a change in the law (as unlikely as that seems). Remain gracious in all dealings on this issue. There are some serious questions that arise and that do need to be worked through: Is there freedom of belief and of speech? Can Christians continue to believe differently? Can Christians state their belief that marriage is a relationship between one man and one woman? Can they say that to an individual homosexual (e.g. in an honest, loving conversation)? Can Christians (e.g. wedding photographers and cake makers) be forced to be involved in something they don’t believe in? If they refuse, is that prejudice? Must churches and ministers be available for same-sex weddings? Should Christians attend same-sex weddings? Related pages
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© 2017 Peter Cheyne
A Christian’s Guide To Homosexuality
Truth In Love
Main sections Main sections

The Ethics Of Same-Sex

Marriage”

Increasingly, nations are legalising same-sex marriage. On 26 June 2015 the Supreme Court of the United States of America ruled that marriage is a constitutional right and that no state could therefore say that same-sex marriage was illegal. The New Zealand parliament made same-sex marriages legal in April 2013 (coming into effect in August 2013). This is a major topic all on its own and needs fuller attention. For the moment, it should be clear that, if homosexual acts are sinful, then same-sex marriage is an institutionalising of sin. No Christian who loves God and His word can condone same- sex marriage. Furthermore, no Christian who loves people can condone it and not care that their sin will bring judgement. Many will argue that since God defines marriage – and He has defined it as the union of a man and a woman – no one has the authority to define it differently. Nations might, if they choose, recognise homosexual relationships and ensure that those in those relationships have the same rights as others, but they should not refer to it as marriage since it doesn’t fit the definition. Christians cannot enforce their ethical standards on others. People and nations will make their own choices. It is, nevertheless, discouraging and alarming for Christians to see people choosing to defy God, and to see governments not using legislation to encourage what is right. What can Christians do? Pray Continue to hold to biblical beliefs Uphold a culture that honours marriage, including modelling strong marriages Be concerned about anything that undermines marriage, including adultery, and any other heterosexual sins. In other words, treat all sexual sin the same way. Re-evaluate the biblical teaching on divorce and be as concerned about that as we are about same-sex marriage. Disciple younger Christians to have a biblical understanding of marriage. Work for a change in the law (as unlikely as that seems). Remain gracious in all dealings on this issue. There are some serious questions that arise and that do need to be worked through: Is there freedom of belief and of speech? Can Christians continue to believe differently? Can Christians state their belief that marriage is a relationship between one man and one woman? Can they say that to an individual homosexual (e.g. in an honest, loving conversation)? Can Christians (e.g. wedding photographers and cake makers) be forced to be involved in something they don’t believe in? If they refuse, is that prejudice? Must churches and ministers be available for same-sex weddings? Should Christians attend same-sex weddings? Related pages
· · · · · · · · · · · ·
© Peter Cheyne 2017.
A Christian’s Guide To Homosexuality
Truth In Love
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